How is radioactive dating done kenyandating co cc

As far as mastery of content, this activity is done in our rocks and minerals unit.Students should have some prior knowledge of rocks and how they are dated. Materials Needed: -100 M&Ms (per group) -Notebook -Piece of Paper -Plastic Container with a Lid Lesson should be introduced by reviewing the 2 broad ways scientists age rocks (relative dating and radioactive dating).Once all groups finish, each group records their info on the class decay table (on the board) and we calculate the averages of the class. Isotope Concepts: Students should begin to see the pattern that each time they dump out their M&Ms, about half become stable.Once this info is calculated, students create a graph comparing the class average of parent isotopes to the number of half-lives. Students will be able to explain what a half-life of a rock is. Students will have a more in-depth understanding of what radioactive decay is. Students will understand how scientists use half-lives to date the age of rocks. Students then should be able to see the connection of the M&Ms and radioactive elements in rocks, and how scientists can determine the age of rocks by looking at the amount of radioactive material in the rock.And if you play with the exponential decay equations, you can come up with the nice formula (1/2)=(current decay rate)/(initial decay rate), where n is the number of half lives that have passed.Voila, now you can tell how old a sample of organic matter is.They then gather the radioactive, or M side up M&Ms, put them back in the container, and then pour them out again. and continue this process until all M&Ms are stable, or M side down.

Then students take the class data and create a graph comparing the number of parent isotopes to the number of half-lives.Once this is done, students have some post questions they are given that they should record in their science notebook.Adapted from: For Special Ed and ELL kids, you could give them a template of the data table/graph.They not only enjoyed this activity, but they really gained a better understanding of it as well.Asked by: William Baker Carbon 14 (C14) is an isotope of carbon with 8 neutrons instead of the more common 6 neutrons.

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