Choice developing edition item multiple test third validating

We speculate that the specific nature of the CRT items helps build construct equivalence among the different response formats.

We recommend using the validated multiple-choice version of the CRT presented here, particularly the four-option CRT, for practical and methodological reasons.

We tested the two hypotheses experimentally by assessing the performance in tests with different response formats and by comparing their predictive and construct validity.

In addition, even if people were equally likely to detect a conflict in the two different response formats and engage in reflective thinking afterward, they might still fail to correct their initial intuition due to lack of mathematical knowledge (Pennycook, Fugelsang, & Koehler, ).

These should result in different levels of performance and different correlational patterns with the benchmark variables usually associated with the CRT.

In the present experiment, our overarching aim was to test the construct equivalence of three different formats of the Cognitive Reflection Test (and its variations).

Supplementary materials and data are available at ). ___ cents.” Participants usually come up with an appealing intuitive yet incorrect answer—10 cents—instead of the correct answer, which requires more analytical processing and some formal computation—5 cents.

The most famous CRT item is the “bat and ball” problem: “A bat and a ball cost

In addition, even if people were equally likely to detect a conflict in the two different response formats and engage in reflective thinking afterward, they might still fail to correct their initial intuition due to lack of mathematical knowledge (Pennycook, Fugelsang, & Koehler, ).

These should result in different levels of performance and different correlational patterns with the benchmark variables usually associated with the CRT.

In the present experiment, our overarching aim was to test the construct equivalence of three different formats of the Cognitive Reflection Test (and its variations).

Supplementary materials and data are available at ). ___ cents.” Participants usually come up with an appealing intuitive yet incorrect answer—10 cents—instead of the correct answer, which requires more analytical processing and some formal computation—5 cents.

The most famous CRT item is the “bat and ball” problem: “A bat and a ball cost $1.10 in total. The test has become increasingly popular, yielding more than 2,000 citations 12 years after its publication on Google Scholar, and has grown into the optimum measure of rational thinking (Toplak, West, & Stanovich, ).

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In addition, even if people were equally likely to detect a conflict in the two different response formats and engage in reflective thinking afterward, they might still fail to correct their initial intuition due to lack of mathematical knowledge (Pennycook, Fugelsang, & Koehler, ).These should result in different levels of performance and different correlational patterns with the benchmark variables usually associated with the CRT.In the present experiment, our overarching aim was to test the construct equivalence of three different formats of the Cognitive Reflection Test (and its variations).Supplementary materials and data are available at ). ___ cents.” Participants usually come up with an appealing intuitive yet incorrect answer—10 cents—instead of the correct answer, which requires more analytical processing and some formal computation—5 cents.The most famous CRT item is the “bat and ball” problem: “A bat and a ball cost $1.10 in total. The test has become increasingly popular, yielding more than 2,000 citations 12 years after its publication on Google Scholar, and has grown into the optimum measure of rational thinking (Toplak, West, & Stanovich, ).

.10 in total. The test has become increasingly popular, yielding more than 2,000 citations 12 years after its publication on Google Scholar, and has grown into the optimum measure of rational thinking (Toplak, West, & Stanovich, ).

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